Treating Hepatitis – The New Indian Express

Express press service

KOCHI: Personalized/precision medicine is a well-established approach that plays a pivotal role while tailoring clinical strategies based on each patient’s genomic, behavioral, and environmental history. This branch of medicine can predict a patient’s response to a drug, whether it will cure the patient or if there will be side effects. It will also help in understanding a patient’s journey through a disease, whether it is cancer or an infection.

In diseases caused by infectious agents, this area focuses on the genetic make-up of the infecting pathogen that is affecting the patient and will help in establishing a tailored diagnosis and treatment plan. Consider hepatitis, an inflammation of the liver. It is caused by infection, alcohol, medication side effects and autoimmune diseases. Symptoms of the disease range from nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite to abdominal pain, the most common being jaundice.

For hepatitis that forms due to an infectious etiology, molecular diagnostic methods are relied upon for diagnosis, giving appropriate care and treatment to patients, especially those with viral hepatitis B and C.These agents of viral hepatitis can cause a long-lasting (chronic) infection, which can lead to severe liver disease and cancer. It is therefore important to detect mutations affecting the viral genome. This is particularly important in patients with chronic infection.

Hepatitis B and C both have more than one genetic type (genotype) and also mutants with altered DNA/RNA which can affect the course of the disease from mild and self-limiting to severe. This will also affect progress.

Mutations can also affect the results of some common tests by allowing the virus to escape detection (escape mutants). Additionally, some mutations may lead to clinical misclassification of the patient’s condition. It will also lead to mistreatment. For example, the negative mutant.

This is where molecular diagnostics comes in. The outcome of the disease varies according to the genotypes and the mutations detected. A mutation, if detected, can alert the physician to potential resistance to antiviral agents and select an appropriate one.

Quantitative PCR tests that detect viral load are a means of molecular diagnosis of patients with chronic hepatitis B. The detection of liver enzyme (ALT) and hepatitis E antigen is also necessary for the management of patients.

Patients are assessed for viral loads in their blood at set intervals to check their response to treatment. The future of treatment is in the hands of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics. These branches will greatly contribute to the daily care of patients.

KOCHI: Personalized/precision medicine is a well-established approach that plays a pivotal role while tailoring clinical strategies based on each patient’s genomic, behavioral, and environmental history. This branch of medicine can predict a patient’s response to a drug, whether it will cure the patient or if there will be side effects. It will also help in understanding a patient’s journey through a disease, whether it is cancer or an infection. In diseases caused by infectious agents, this area focuses on the genetic make-up of the infecting pathogen that is affecting the patient and will help in establishing a tailored diagnosis and treatment plan. Consider hepatitis, an inflammation of the liver. It is caused by infection, alcohol, medication side effects and autoimmune diseases. Symptoms of the disease range from nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite to abdominal pain, the most common being jaundice. For hepatitis that forms due to an infectious etiology, molecular diagnostic methods are relied upon for diagnosis, giving appropriate care and treatment to patients, especially those with viral hepatitis B and C.These agents of viral hepatitis can cause a long-lasting (chronic) infection, which can lead to severe liver disease and cancer. It is therefore important to detect mutations affecting the viral genome. This is particularly important in patients with chronic infection. Hepatitis B and C both have more than one genetic type (genotype) and also mutants with altered DNA/RNA which can affect the course of the disease from mild and self-limiting to severe. This will also affect progress. Mutations can also affect the results of some common tests by allowing the virus to escape detection (escape mutants). Additionally, some mutations may lead to clinical misclassification of the patient’s condition. It will also lead to mistreatment. For example, the negative mutant. This is where molecular diagnostics comes in. The outcome of the disease varies according to the genotypes and the mutations detected. A mutation, if detected, can alert the physician to potential resistance to antiviral agents and select an appropriate one. Quantitative PCR tests that detect viral load are a means of molecular diagnosis of patients with chronic hepatitis B. The detection of liver enzyme (ALT) and hepatitis E antigen is also necessary for the management of patients. Patients are assessed for viral loads in their blood at set intervals to check their response to treatment. The future of treatment is in the hands of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics. These branches will greatly contribute to the daily care of patients.

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