Chlamydia test – Heiki http://heiki.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:37:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://heiki.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Chlamydia test – Heiki http://heiki.org/ 32 32 Man Stuffed His Penis In Water Bottles, Giving 3 People Herpes: Cops https://heiki.org/man-stuffed-his-penis-in-water-bottles-giving-3-people-herpes-cops/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:37:55 +0000 https://heiki.org/man-stuffed-his-penis-in-water-bottles-giving-3-people-herpes-cops/

The janitor was filmed as he thrust his penis into a water bottle, according to court records.

The janitor was filmed as he thrust his penis into a water bottle, according to court records.

A janitor accused of rubbing his penis inside water bottles while working at a family doctor’s office in Texas transmitted a sexually transmitted disease to three people, court records show.

The former janitor was arrested after a woman working in the office noticed his water bottle smelled bad, McClatchy News reported. The woman, identified by police as MA, told Houston authorities that she threw that bottle away, but then found yellow liquid in her new water bottle.

A urinalysis confirmed the presence of urine in his water, according to a lawsuit filed in Harris County on Oct. 14. The janitor was then filmed twice as he put his penis in his water bottle.

The “entire mouth of the water bottle” touched his penis during the recording, police said, and the inside of the bottle surrounded his penis.

Janitor Lucio Catarino Diaz, 50, was arrested Oct. 5 and charged with “aggravated assault – bodily harm with a deadly weapon,” records show. He was infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 and chlamydia when he was taken into custody.

The woman who reported Diaz told authorities she did not have any STDs prior to the incidents, but has since tested positive for the same incurable and life-threatening type of herpes, officials said.

A Texas forensic nurse examiner has confirmed that she could have contracted the virus when she drank from a bottle of water that Diaz rubbed his penis in.

Since then, Diaz has been charged with two additional counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

In the two complaints filed Nov. 17, authorities said he caused two other people — identified as NC and DC — to contract herpes simplex virus 1. Authorities said Diaz “used his penis to secretly rub the insides of (their water bottles) knowing that he would bring (their mouths) in contact with… bodily fluids from his penis.

Authorities did not say whether NC and DC worked in the doctor’s office.

At least 13 people have accused Diaz of peeing in their water, according to KTRK.

Diaz is due in court on Nov. 28.

Kaitlyn Alanis is a McClatchy national real-time reporter based in Kansas. She is an alumnus of agricultural communication and journalism at Kansas State University.

]]>
What to expect on your first women’s wellness exam – Forbes Health https://heiki.org/what-to-expect-on-your-first-womens-wellness-exam-forbes-health/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 21:13:57 +0000 https://heiki.org/what-to-expect-on-your-first-womens-wellness-exam-forbes-health/

During a healthy woman exam, your doctor will review all of your current medical issues and determine if there is anything missing in the care, Dr. Marchand says. It’s important to note that medicine is constantly changing, so recommended treatment can vary greatly in a single year, he adds. The doctor should examine you from head to toe, check your vital signs and determine if you need any vaccinations. The visit usually includes the following:

Medical history and physical examination

Upon arrival, you will undergo a routine physical examination which includes taking your weight, pulse and blood pressure. A urine sample may be requested to test for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and rule out urinary tract infections, says Dr. Alagia. “You will be asked to put on a gown after being left alone in the examination room. Once your healthcare professional walks into the room, they should take a few moments to review the test they plan to perform and explain the reason for the specific test,” he says.

You will have time before, after, and during the exam to ask and answer any questions you and your healthcare provider may have. It is helpful to prepare a list of questions in advance.

The questions your doctor asks will be tailored to your age and medical history, says Dr. Swarup. For example, they may ask if you smoke, use drugs or alcohol, have any allergies or infections, and if you’ve had any surgeries, he says — all of these factors can affect your reproductive health.

Your doctor may ask the following questions, according to Dr. Swarup:

  • When was your last period?
  • How often do your periods occur and how long do they last?
  • Is there any bleeding between your periods?
  • Is there any itching, pain or vaginal discharge?
  • Do you have any medical concerns?
  • Do any members of your family have any medical problems?
  • How often are you sexually active and have a new partner?
  • What kind of sex do you have? It’s painful? Do you ever bleed afterwards?
  • Do you use birth control?
  • Are you worried about being pregnant?
  • Are you trying to get pregnant?
  • What do you use to prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)?

It’s important to be completely honest in your answers because the questions are good for your health, says Dr. Marchand. “Remember that a doctor can never share personal information about your visit (this could easily result in disciplinary action from the medical board or the loss of your license to practice),” he says. Doctors may share your information with other members of their healthcare team if it is necessary to provide your care or coordinate your care. Doctors may also share your information with your permission. Physicians may also share your information with law enforcement to prevent or mitigate a serious and imminent threat to the health or safety of an individual or the public. Dr. Alagia adds that having an honest dialogue with your healthcare professional helps them recommend guideline-based care such as STD screening, cancer screening, and other services.

You should also expect questions about your diet, life stressors and exercise habits, says Dr. Marchand. “Because screening for depression and anxiety is so important for all patients, you should be prepared to answer questions about how you are feeling,” he says.

Breast examination

Starting at age 20, a breast exam can be done every one to three years to identify any irregularities or lumps, Dr. Swarup says, but recommendations vary. For example, ACOG advises that clinical breast exams can be offered every one to three years for women aged 25 to 39 and once a year for women over 40.

The American Cancer Society does not recommend clinical breast exams or breast self-exams at all due to the lack of evidence that they do little to help detect breast cancer early when mammography is available. Currently, mammograms (x-ray images of the breast) are recommended annually for women over 45 and once every two years for women over 55.

ACOG offers women between the ages of 25 and 39 a clinical breast exam every one to three years and women over the age of 40 an annual exam. Either way, ACOG recommends that women make the decision that’s best for them.

If your practitioner performs a clinical breast exam, you’ll be asked to raise one arm behind your head, says Dr. Alagia. This allows your doctor to better examine each breast, applying light pressure in circular motions. “They will look for abnormal lumps or cysts. If any lumps are discovered, a biopsy will be ordered to determine if they are cancerous or not,” explains Dr. Alagia.

Pelvic exam

A pelvic or internal exam is done to check the vulva, vagina, cervix, fallopian tubes, ovaries, and rectum for abnormalities. Teenage girls do not need a pelvic exam unless they have abnormal bleeding, discharge, or pelvic pain. You are unlikely to have a pelvic exam before age 21 unless such symptoms are present. Although the exam may be uncomfortable, it should not be painful. Keeping your body relaxed will help minimize discomfort.

During a pelvic exam, your doctor will also examine your vulva and rectum for irritation, redness, or other concerning signs, says Dr. Swarup. A lubricated speculum is placed in the vagina to look inside, which allows the cervix to be assessed for signs of disease. After removing the speculum, your doctor gently inserts one or two fingers (using a lubricated glove) into your vaginal canal while applying gentle pressure to your lower abdomen, Dr. Alagia says. This allows them to check for abnormalities in the size, shape, and position of the uterus and ovaries.

You can expect to feel some pressure, says Dr. Alagia, adding that it’s important to communicate any feelings of pain, heaviness, bloating or tenderness — this helps your doctor understand potential causes for concern.

Cervical cancer screening

Depending on your age, you may be screened for cervical cancer with a Pap test and/or a human papillomavirus (HPV) test during your pelvic exam. A Pap test looks for cell changes in the cervix that can turn into cervical cancer, and an HPV test checks for the presence of human papillomavirus, the virus responsible for these changes.

Current guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force advise that women ages 21 to 29 be screened every three years with a Pap test alone; women aged 30 to 65 can be screened every three years with a Pap test only, every five years with an HPV test only, or every five years with both.

For HPV and Pap tests, your healthcare provider will insert a lubricated speculum into your vaginal canal to view your vagina and cervix, Dr. Alagia says. “They will wipe your cervix with a swab and send it to a lab to make sure there are no signs of cervical cancer and make sure your cervix uterus is healthy,” he says.

Screening for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)

Even if you think you’re not at risk, you should discuss STD testing with your doctor, says Dr. Alagia. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following testing schedule for STDS:

  • All adults and adolescents between the ages of 13 and 64 should be tested for HIV at least once.
  • All sexually active women under 25 should be tested annually for gonorrhea and chlamydia, and women over 25 with new or multiple sexual partners or a sexual partner with an STD should be tested annually.
  • Pregnant women should be tested for syphilis, HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C early in pregnancy, and those at risk (new sex partners or multiple sex partners) should also be tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea.

Home HPV Test

Nurx’s quick, easy, at-home HPV test helps detect HPV strains that may cause cervical cancer.

]]>
Nouris’ statements about the number of people infected in Pournara have been proven to be false https://heiki.org/nouris-statements-about-the-number-of-people-infected-in-pournara-have-been-proven-to-be-false/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 10:39:53 +0000 https://heiki.org/nouris-statements-about-the-number-of-people-infected-in-pournara-have-been-proven-to-be-false/

What are cookies

As is common practice with almost all professional websites, https://cyprus-mail.com (our “To place”) uses cookies, which are tiny files downloaded to your device, to improve your experience.

This document describes what information they collect, how we use it and why we sometimes need to store these cookies. We will also share how you can prevent these cookies from being stored, however this may downgrade or ‘break’ certain elements of the site’s functionality.

How we use cookies

We use cookies for a variety of reasons detailed below. Unfortunately, in most cases there are no industry standard options for disabling cookies without completely disabling the features and functionality they add to the site. It is recommended that you leave all cookies on if you are unsure whether or not you need them, in case they are used to provide a service you use.

The types of cookies used on this Site can be classified into one of the following three categories:

  1. Strictly Necessary Cookies: These are essential to enable you to use certain features of the website, such as submitting forms on the website.
  2. Functionality cookies: These are used to allow the website to remember choices you make (like your language) and to provide enhanced functionality to improve your web experience.
  3. Analytical / navigation cookies: These cookies allow the site to function properly and are used to collect information about how visitors use the site. This information is used to compile reports and to help us improve the site. The cookies collect information in an anonymous form, including the number of visitors to the site, where visitors have come from and the pages they have visited.

Disabling cookies

You can prevent the installation of cookies by adjusting your browser settings (see the “Help” option of your browser to find out how to do this). Please be aware that disabling cookies may affect the functionality of this site and many other websites you visit. Therefore, it is recommended not to disable cookies.

Third-party cookies

In some special cases, we also use cookies provided by trusted third parties. Our Site uses [Google Analytics] which is one of the most widespread and trusted analytics solution on the web for helping us understand how you use the site and how we can improve your experience. These cookies may track things such as how long you spend on the site and the pages you visit so that we can continue to produce engaging content. For more information about Google Analytics cookies, see the official Google Analytics page.

Google Analytics

Google Analytics is Google’s analytics tool that helps our website understand how visitors interact with their properties. It may use a set of cookies to collect information and generate website usage statistics without personally identifying individual visitors to Google. The main cookie used by Google Analytics is the ‘__ga’ cookie.

In addition to website usage statistics, Google Analytics may also be used, together with some of the advertising cookies, to help display more relevant ads on Google properties (like Google Search) and across the web and to measure interactions with ads served by Google. .

Learn more about Analytics cookies and privacy information.

Use of IP addresses

An IP address is a numeric code that identifies your device on the Internet. We may use your IP address and browser type to help analyze usage patterns and diagnose problems on this site and to improve our service to you. But without additional information, your IP address does not identify you as an individual.

Your choice

When you accessed this site, our cookies were sent to your web browser and stored on your device. By using our site, you agree to the use of cookies and similar technologies.

More information

I hope the information above has clarified things for you. As mentioned earlier, if you are unsure whether or not you want to allow cookies, it is generally safest to leave cookies enabled in case they interact with one of the features you use on our site. However, if you are still looking for more information, please do not hesitate to contact us by e-mail at [email protected]

]]>
Lawsuit against Purdue University basketball player Isaac Haas dropped for spreading herpes https://heiki.org/lawsuit-against-purdue-university-basketball-player-isaac-haas-dropped-for-spreading-herpes/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:48:33 +0000 https://heiki.org/lawsuit-against-purdue-university-basketball-player-isaac-haas-dropped-for-spreading-herpes/

LAFAYETTE, Ind. – A lawsuit filed against Purdue and former basketball player Isaac Haas, accusing him of lying about an STD and claiming the university cleared it, has been dismissed.

A summary judgment in the case against Hass and Purdue filed this week says Haas “is no longer a party to the case” and there is insufficient evidence to prove the school was negligent.

Background

The lawsuit was originally filed by Alyssa Chambers in Tippecanoe Circuit Court in 2018 and named Haas and Purdue University as defendants.

The incident began when Haas and Chambers engaged in a brief sexual encounter on May 15, 2017, and she was discovered to be infected with herpes two weeks later. She claimed she had not had sex with anyone other than Haas between the day they had sex and the day she was diagnosed.

The case against Haas, which has since been dropped, claimed he tried to cover up his infections, dispute Chambers’ claims and persuade her not to press charges.

Haas allegedly told Chambers he had been treated for chlamydia and was “clean” when they met, according to the lawsuit.

The former basketball player also claimed he was tested, diagnosed, treated and retested by the university’s student health services, who told him he was “clean,” according to the lawsuit.

Case against Purdue

The lawsuit also focused on the University’s involvement. Specifically, Chambers claimed that Purdue, through the Department of Athletics and Health Services, had established an “unwritten policy” not to test athletes for STDs.

According to its claim, Purdue did this to enable athletes to obtain STD treatment without diagnosis as well as to “minimize exposure to liability, assist with recruitment and ensure players remain available for games.” .

Chambers’ claim ended by saying that this alleged Purdue policy caused him foreseeable harm by allowing Haas to claim he had been treated when it was still unclear what treatment he had. same need.

Purdue’s argument

Purdue argued in the case that the House request should be dismissed because it was not filed under the Medical Malpractice Act, but the courts disagreed.

“This argument would have merit if Chambers alleged that Purdue healthcare providers, alone, created and implemented such a policy,” the court documents read. “However, that is not the case.”

However, Purdue also argued that as a matter of law, it does not have a common law duty to protect its students from STD infection. Additionally, the University has “categorically denied” a no-testing policy for student-athletes.

The jugement

This week, summary judgment in the case was filed, dismissing all Chambers claims against Haas and Purdue.

According to the courts, Chambers provided “no evidence for her allegation” that she was infected with herpes due to an unwritten policy within Purdue’s athletic department.

“Haas did not discuss this with them and health care providers repeatedly recommended additional testing,” the judgment reads.

]]>
More bites needed to halt second wave of monkeypox despite falling infection numbers https://heiki.org/more-bites-needed-to-halt-second-wave-of-monkeypox-despite-falling-infection-numbers/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 21:00:46 +0000 https://heiki.org/more-bites-needed-to-halt-second-wave-of-monkeypox-despite-falling-infection-numbers/

More bites needed to halt second wave of monkeypox despite falling infection numbers, experts warn

  • Just over half of those eligible for the jab came forward during the UK deployment
  • It mainly affects gay men and is transmitted through close physical contact.
  • Monkeypox can kill. Last week it was announced that two men in the US had died

The UK could be hit with a second wave of monkeypox cases if vaccination efforts do not improve, experts have warned.

While the number of infections has fallen, doctors believe this is due to changes in sexual behavior rather than the success of the vaccination campaign.

Just over half of those eligible for the vaccine, which offers strong protection against the painful blistering disease, have come forward.

The condition primarily affects gay men and is spread through close physical contact – usually sex.

In some cases, monkeypox can kill. Last week it was announced that two men in the United States had died after contracting the disease.

Just over half of those eligible for the jab (above), which offers strong protection against the painful blistering disease, have come forward

Doctors involved in the UK rollout say attempts to get more men to come forward for the vaccine have been hampered by a lack of government support.

Vaccinators involved in the deployment this summer have now been redeployed to help administer flu, polio and MMR vaccines, and Covid boosters. This means that many clinics do not have enough staff to offer the monkeypox vaccine.

We’re just not ready for another case spike

Earlier this month, NHS England launched a website which would help men find the nearest monkeypox vaccination clinic. But doctors say many advertised clinics are unable to offer injections.

“Many sites outside of London are not ready or able to provide monkeypox vaccines,” says Dr John McSorley, sexual health consultant at London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust. “The NHS promotes this website, but most clinics on it will not be able to deliver.”

According to the UK Health Security Agency, there were 12 new cases of monkeypox last week, down from a peak of around 150 new cases each week in August.

But experts say that could quickly change. “Cases are down because people are worried about catching it and having less sex,” says Dr Claire Dewsnap from the UK Association for Sexual Health and HIV.

“We know this because new cases of other sexual diseases like syphilis are also declining. But people will revert to their old sexual patterns, so we have to be ready for another spike in monkeypox cases. Given the state of the vaccine rollout, we are nowhere near ready for that.

An NHS spokesperson said: “More than 100 clinics have chosen to be part of the site search to ensure those not in contact with sexual health services can be protected.”

German monkeypox patient whose nose started rotting because his HIV and syphilis ravaged his immune system

The nose of a monkeypox patient has started to rot in one of the most shocking cases documented in the current outbreak.

The 40-year-old, from Germany, went to his GP with a red patch on his nose which was initially described as sunburn.

But within three days, the skin on his nose began to die off and darken, leaving him with a painful, swollen scab.

Nose of 40-year-old monkeypox patient started rotting due to undiagnosed <a class=HIV infection in Germany, doctors say” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

Nose of 40-year-old monkeypox patient started rotting due to undiagnosed HIV infection in Germany, doctors say

Around the same time, pus-filled white patches developed all over his body, which was especially bad on his penis and around his mouth.

A PCR test confirmed he was infected with monkeypox and he was taken to hospital and given antiviral treatment.

Further tests revealed the patient, who has not been named, also had undiagnosed syphilis and HIV. He told doctors he had never been tested for a sexually transmitted infection (STI) before.

The man was given medicine to treat the infections and the lesions dried up, but his nose has “only partially improved”.

Doctors said his case became so severe because untreated HIV left him immunocompromised, putting him at greater risk of necrosis.

Advertising

]]>
Monkeypox worse for patients with weakened immune systems https://heiki.org/monkeypox-worse-for-patients-with-weakened-immune-systems/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 11:36:39 +0000 https://heiki.org/monkeypox-worse-for-patients-with-weakened-immune-systems/

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) — As monkeypox cases decline in the United States, a new government report shows that patients with weakened immune systems, especially those living with HIV, have been particularly affected by the virus.

Even after taking antiviral drugs for monkeypox, people with untreated HIV were more likely to end up in hospital, researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.

Since May, around 28,000 cases of monkeypox have been reported in this country and 12 people hospitalized with the virus have died.

In the report, CDC scientists described the cases of 57 patients treated between mid-August and October 10.

All the patients had serious lesions caused by the virus, including 39 people who suffered damage to their eyes, mouth and other mucous membranes.

Almost all of the hospitalized patients were black, 54 were men, three were pregnant and almost 25% were homeless. Two of the patients were undergoing chemotherapy, according to the report. Three others had received organ transplants. About a third of these 57 patients were treated in intensive care.

While approximately 5% to 10% of patients with monkeypox are admitted to hospital, those with HIV are more likely to be hospitalized, the Washington Post reported.

Of the deaths associated with monkeypox, six are still under investigation, according to the report.

The virus typically affects men who have sex with men in the current outbreak, causing painful lesions even when not severe. People living with HIV and people of color represent a disproportionate share of patients. About 38% of monkeypox cases were in someone living with HIV, according to a review of 2,000 cases this summer, the Job reported.

Doctors should test for HIV in all sexually active patients in whom they suspect monkeypox. They should consider treatment for monkeypox in “highly immunocompromised” patients, including those with advanced HIV, the CDC said.

Patients who are being treated for their HIV do not appear to be at increased risk for monkeypox, said Anu Hazra, co-medical director of Howard Brown Health, an LGBT healthcare provider in Chicago. Job.

“While we know that HIV impacts our immune system, we also know that not all people living with HIV are the same,” Hazra noted.

The CDC report detailed specific cases of monkeypox, including that of a Latino man in his 20s who tested positive after going to the emergency room with back pain and a rash. He was also HIV-positive and died after his condition rapidly worsened with difficulty breathing and kidney failure, despite being treated with TPoxx and receiving HIV treatment in hospital.

Another patient was a black man in his thirties who had AIDS and was not being treated. He had a rash in July and was tested and treated for gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis. His injuries worsened and he was admitted to hospital with monkeypox, but discharged with a supply of TPoxx. His condition improved, then worsened again and he was hospitalized with an antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection. He continued to bounce back, before being readmitted for his symptoms.

A white man in his 40s who had not received treatment for AIDS also bounced between hospital and discharge with treatment given at varying times. He eventually had a toe and part of one of his index fingers amputated despite multiple treatments. He remains hospitalized.

“This is an important depiction of the severe consequences of monkeypox and should underscore the critical importance of getting vaccines, treatments and risk messages to the most severely affected communities,” said Anne Rimoin, an epidemiologist at UCLA who has studied monkeypox for two decades. say it Job. “The disproportionate impact on communities that have less access to health services is the same story we see repeated locally and globally.”

More information

The World Health Organization has additional information on monkeypox.

THE SOURCE: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ReportOctober 27, 2022, Washington Post

From articles on your site

Related articles on the web

]]>
US health agency warns of worsening sexual health crisis https://heiki.org/us-health-agency-warns-of-worsening-sexual-health-crisis/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://heiki.org/us-health-agency-warns-of-worsening-sexual-health-crisis/

More funding is needed for sexual health services as well as innovative screening and prevention tools to combat an “alarming” rise in sexually transmitted infections in the United States, the country’s top public health agency has warned.

Dr Leandro Mena, director of the division of STD prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told the Financial Times that new data showing the number of syphilis cases rose by more than a quarter the year last highlighted the “crisis” that is unfolding in the sexual realm. America’s health.

Rising cases of syphilis and other bacterial STDs – such as gonorrhea and chlamydia – are fueled by a combination of underfunding of sexual health services, reduced condom use among certain groups and stigma surrounding sexual diseases and access to treatment, he said.

“We find these [statistics] quite alarming. For six or seven years in a row, STI rates have been rising in the United States, and last year’s 26% jump in syphilis cases was one of the largest year-over-year increases ever. we have ever seen,” he said.

The resurgence of STIs in the United States and elsewhere is worrying health officials, who warn that wards are already overstretched due to Covid-19 and monkeypox. Last year, the CDC estimated that one in five Americans had an STI at some point in 2018 and that the lifetime cost of treating new infections acquired in that year alone would be $16 billion. .

Mena said America’s sexual health prevention and treatment services have been underfunded for more than two decades, resulting in more than a 40% reduction in per capita purchasing power when inflation is taken into account. This has led to a decrease in testing and tracing services in many communities, he said.

“To deal with the crisis that we recognize we have in America’s sexual health, I think we really need innovation,” Mena said. “We need to improve access to affordable sexual health services free from stigma and discrimination. . . we need more tools to fight the national outbreak of bacterial STIs.

Preliminary data released last month by the CDC shows that 2.5 million bacterial STI infections were reported in 2021, a 4.4% increase from the previous year. The number of gonorrhea and chlamydia cases rose about 3% year-on-year, while reported cases of syphilis, a life-threatening disease when left untreated, rose much more rapidly.

Syphilis infection rates hit an all-time low in 2000-2001, according to CDC data, but have been rising steadily since then. Over a five-year period, reported cases of syphilis have increased by almost 70%, while the number of congenital cases – when a mother passes a syphilis infection to her baby during pregnancy – jumped by 184% since 2017.

Congenital syphilis can have devastating consequences that affect perhaps the most vulnerable people in society, newborn babies. It is also 100% preventable, so in many ways it represents failures in our systems,” Mena said.

He said there has been a decline in condom use among certain groups, including young people and men who have sex with men, as the availability of antiretroviral treatment for HIV has expanded in recent years. last years. Drug addiction and the opioid epidemic are linked to increases in risky sexual behaviors, and stigma has played a role in preventing people from accessing testing services and treatment, Mena said.

He said people needed access to ‘stigmatism-free and affordable’ sexual health screening services to tackle rising infection rates. Developing and rolling out home testing kits and point-of-sale testing in pharmacies or places other than health clinics could also help, Mena added.

Dr. Leandro Mena: “We need to improve access to affordable sexual health services free from stigma and discrimination” © Brandon Clifton/CDC

He said the CDC was evaluating “exciting” research published in July that showed a single pill of a common antibiotic taken up to three days after sex could significantly reduce infection rates from bacterial STIs. .

“We are very encouraged by these initial data in an NIH-funded study for the use of doxycycline as post-exposure prophylaxis to prevent infection,” Mena said.

He said the agency wanted to review the full study data before advising doctors on the use of doxycycline among high-risk groups. This would examine the issue of antimicrobial resistance and whether prescribing the antibiotic in this way could cause other pathogens to develop resistance against doxycycline, Mena said.

]]>
City Leaders Launch New Mobile Health Testing Van to Serve Southwest Ohio https://heiki.org/city-leaders-launch-new-mobile-health-testing-van-to-serve-southwest-ohio/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 20:17:00 +0000 https://heiki.org/city-leaders-launch-new-mobile-health-testing-van-to-serve-southwest-ohio/ Mayor Aftab, alongside officials from Equitas Health, on Thursday announced a new Mobile Neighborhood Vehicle (MOVe) to serve Cincinnati and surrounding areas. Equitas Health is one of the largest healthcare organizations serving LGBTQ+ and HIV/AIDS in the nation and this vehicle will expand its reach in Southwest Ohio. The new unit will be a mobile sexual health clinic that will offer testing and treatment for HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and hepatitis C. Patients will also be able to get help with navigation in health care, registration for medical insurance and link to other health care. “As a city committed to helping every resident live a happy, healthy and fulfilling life, we must do what we can to get out into the community and meet people where they need it,” Mayor Aftab said. “The new mobile unit has the power to have a profound impact on the health and well-being of our most vulnerable residents, and we couldn’t be more proud to support Equitas Health as they expand their services here in Cincinnati. .” Officials said the vehicle was being purchased with funding provided by the City of Cincinnati and will be the first in Equitas Health’s fleet to provide services exclusively in southwestern Ohio. “This new mobile unit will be an important tool in helping end the HIV epidemic right here in Cincinnati,” said Dwayne Steward, chief human resources and culture officer at Equitas Santé. “Unfortunately, the groups most affected by poor health and well-being outcomes are less likely to access physical health facilities. This new MOVe unit allows us to go where care is needed most. In Cincinnati, the new unit will be a mobile sexual health clinic that will offer testing and treatment for HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and hepatitis C. Patients can also get help to navigate health care, purchase medical insurance, and connect to other health care. services. “Comprehensive, affirmative health care shouldn’t depend on your zip code,” said Robert Copeland, interim CEO and director of advancement at Equitas Health. “We know the disparities that exist in the communities we serve. So if they can’t come to us, we will come to them. ” For more information, click here.

Mayor Aftab, alongside officials from Equitas Health, on Thursday announced a new Mobile Neighborhood Vehicle (MOVe) to serve Cincinnati and surrounding areas.

Equitas Health is one of the largest healthcare organizations serving LGBTQ+ and HIV/AIDS in the nation and this vehicle will expand its reach in Southwest Ohio.

The new unit will be a mobile sexual health clinic that will offer testing and treatment for HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and hepatitis C.

Patients will also be able to get help navigating healthcare, enrolling in medical insurance and connecting to other healthcare services.

“As a city committed to helping every resident live a happy, healthy and fulfilling life, we must do what we can to get out into the community and meet people where their needs are,” Mayor Aftab said. “The new mobile unit has the power to have a profound impact on the health and well-being of our most vulnerable residents, and we couldn’t be more proud to support Equitas Health as they expand their services here in Cincinnati. .

Officials said the vehicle was purchased with funding provided by the City of Cincinnati and would be the first in Equitas Health’s fleet to provide service exclusively in southwestern Ohio.

“This new mobile unit will be an important tool in helping to end the HIV epidemic right here in Cincinnati,” said Dwayne Steward, director of human resources and culture at Equitas Health. “Unfortunately, the groups most affected by poor health and well-being outcomes are less likely to access physical health facilities. This new MOVe unit allows us to go where care is needed most.

Columbus-based Equitas Health launched its mobile health fleet in early 2021. The program has seen success through targeted outreach.

In Cincinnati, the new unit will be a mobile sexual health clinic that will offer testing and treatment for HIV, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and hepatitis C. Patients can also get help to navigate health care, purchase medical insurance, and connect to other health care. services.

“Comprehensive, affirmative health care shouldn’t depend on your zip code,” said Robert Copeland, interim CEO and director of advancement at Equitas Health. “We know the disparities that exist in the communities we serve. So if they can’t come to us, we’ll come to them.

For more information, click here.

]]>
Tampa startup brings medical testing to your door • St Pete Catalyst https://heiki.org/tampa-startup-brings-medical-testing-to-your-door-st-pete-catalyst/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 18:58:59 +0000 https://heiki.org/tampa-startup-brings-medical-testing-to-your-door-st-pete-catalyst/

To simply take a DNA or Covid test, patients may need doctor’s notes, go from clinic to clinic, and pay hundreds of dollars to possibly get an answer.

Tampa entrepreneur Carlos Roldan has developed lab kits and an app that are democratizing health testing.

His company, 24-7 Labs, which has offices and a lab in Tampa, makes testing accessible to those who want private and affordable health testing.

“There is so much hassle trying to get tested. It’s very inconvenient to go through multiple doctors and clinics to order a simple test,” Roldan, CEO and Founder, said of his motivation to start the startup, adding how many people are uninsured and can’t get themselves. afford the cost of clinic visits.

“My family members have always been entrepreneurs and doctors in my country of origin, Colombia, and I consulted them. I have also done extensive research with the AHCA [Agency for Health Care Administration] and CMS [ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services] to make sure what I wanted to do was within the regulations,” he said.

Before starting his medical work, Roldan was a salesman and lived in New York.

The startup does lab work for DNA testing, STDs (sexually transmitted diseases), Covid, allergies, and diabetes, as well as heart tests and blood work.

24-7 Labs’ Covid-19 PCR tests began rolling out in mid-2021, authorized by the federal government to expedite the urgent need for testing during the pandemic.

However, Roldan said the STD tests really spurred the startup’s growth.

“For the home STD test, we had to register it for federal approval because we are sending a real medical device. It really turned out to be a game-changer, people can skip the lines at the clinic and get tested at home, and we provide (initial) medication at no cost,” he said. .

The kits are available for purchase directly on the website and on Amazon. Once the test has been received by the laboratory, the person will receive a final report within two days.

For example, if someone is diagnosed with chlamydia, the patient will receive a medication consent form indicating the pharmacy where they wish to pick up the medication. If the person needs refills, they can create an account with 24-7 labs.

Roldan said the information is not shared with insurers.

He founded the company several years ago, but it wasn’t until 2018 that it really started to take off. He aims to add more testing solutions for thyroid disease and wants to work with Planned Parenthood.

The company has an office in New Port Richey, one in Temple Terrace and a third on Memorial Highway. The lab is based in Oldsmar.

24-7 Labs has a team of seven members, Roldan said, more than half of whom are professional medical staff.

Roldan is currently looking to raise $500,000 to $1 million in a seed round that would help the company move into its next phase.

“I’ve been alone on this journey and I’ve always loved the idea of ​​having a partner to not only invest in this project, but to shoulder some of the weight and responsibility,” he said. , stating that it was also open to institutional investors.

While the current business model is business-to-consumer, Roldan said he wants to pursue the distribution side – where companies can buy his kits in bulk.

]]>
A test for thalassemia patients https://heiki.org/a-test-for-thalassemia-patients/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 14:10:20 +0000 https://heiki.org/a-test-for-thalassemia-patients/

For the past 5 years, 11-year-old Jai has been a regular visitor to his city’s government hospital. He was diagnosed with thalassemia when he was 6 years old and needs blood transfusions at regular intervals. Last month he fell ill after a blood transfusion and was rushed to the nearest hospital. After medical investigation, it was revealed that he had contracted the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through a blood transfusion. Such cases highlight the need to implement better screening and blood testing standards in India.
With around 42 million carriers of beta thalassemia and 10,000 new cases diagnosed every year, one in eight patients with thalassemia resides in India. The lifelong thalassemia treatment regime puts parents under enormous financial stress. As thalassemia patients require regular blood transfusions, they are always susceptible to transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs). There has been an increase in cases of transfusion-related illnesses due to poor blood safety and lack of proper testing. According to data shared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in 100 HIV-positive patients could be the victim of an infected blood transfusion in India. Although it is mandatory to screen all units of blood collected for hepatitis B virus (HBV), HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), syphilis and malaria by serological tests, there remains a risk of transmission of TTIs due to serological infections, hidden diseases and the emergence of new variants and viruses. Therefore, it is high time to bring structural reforms to the blood transfusion process by adding an extra layer of protection.

NAT test: a new benchmark for blood safety

Blood safety is an ever-evolving concept that needs to be updated as technology improves. There should be basic checks and standards to ensure the blood is safe and of good quality. The current test system, the enzyme immunoassay technique (ELISA), has a higher residual risk of transmitting infections due to a longer window period. Today, with advances in technology, we have a more effective test called Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) which detects viral infections by shortening the window period and plays a vital role in improving blood safety. . NAT testing can reduce the risk of ITT when performed in addition to ELISA. Although many countries have made the NAT test mandatory, it is still only a recommended test for screening ITT in India under the Medicines and Cosmetics Act 2022. However, this law does not talk about blood safety. NAT testing is confined to a few regions due to lack of awareness, infrastructure, and high cost.

Need for a rigorous regulatory framework

Blood is classified as a ‘drug’ under section 2(b) of the Medicines and Cosmetics Act 1940. This law and its rules provide the legal framework for regulating the operation of blood banks. The Supreme Court in 1996 issued several directives to ensure blood safety, which included the establishment of the National Blood Transfusion Council (NBTC) and National Blood Transfusion Councils (SBTC), mandating the granting of blood bank licenses, framing an immediate and long-term strategy. term plan for blood safety and the adoption of separate legislation to regulate blood processes. Although further guidance has been implemented, no action has been taken with respect to the implementation of a long-term plan for blood safety with separate legislation in place.

As the new Drugs, Medical Devices and Cosmetics Bill, 2022 takes the right approach in the direction of the government’s progressive initiatives in regards to online pharmacies, Ayush products, medical devices and trials clinics, he fails to mention one of the most important healthcare resources, blood.

A gift that saves lives

With India being the thalassemia capital of the world, the healthcare system is under increasing pressure to ensure safe and standardized blood transfusion services. Voluntary blood donation and the best screening methodologies such as NAT therefore assume a sense of urgency. Today, several large hospitals have incorporated NAT testing, while smaller banks still follow the traditional method. Through a collaborative approach between government, private stakeholders and NGOs, the provision of safe and timely blood to thalassemia patients may soon become a reality. For starters, it would be important to adopt safe blood practices, including voluntary blood donation and standardization of screening technology. However, it would be relevant to work towards a separate regulatory framework for blood transfusion services which not only appoints a single regulatory authority, but also gives it statutory powers.

Now is the time to outline India’s path to ensure blood safety for its people. As a step towards modernizing the regulatory architecture, India needs to constantly review its blood regulatory framework to reflect breakthroughs in TTIs and testing technology for their detection.



LinkedIn


Disclaimer

The opinions expressed above are those of the author.



END OF ARTICLE



]]>